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Click on the flash or non-flash box to call up the map. Use the scroll bars at the side and the bottom of the page to travel around the map.
Maps  
Maps are important sources of historical evidence. They can show how crowded an area was and how wide the streets were. This tells us about people’s living conditions. If you look at old maps of an area and compare them to a modern map you can see how much an area has changed over the centuries. Sometimes important buildings are shown on maps. These might be market places or large warehouses or churches. These important buildings also tell us about what was important to the community. Street names can also give information. For example Fashion Street off Brick Lane is named after the cloth and tailoring industries.

The maps in this section are all places where Huguenot people settled from the sixteenth century onwards.


Map of London by Agas, 1572

Map of London by Agas, 1572

This map of London was drawn in the same year as the St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre.

In August the people of Paris turned on the Protestant community known as Huguenots. It is estimated that 100,000 people were killed throughout France. Others were put in prison.

Those who could fled. Many refugees came to London, bringing many skills.

Rocque's map of London, 1746, showing the 'Dutch Church' of Austin Friars

Rocque's map of London, 1746, showing the 'Dutch Church' of Austin Friars

The ‘Dutch Church’ was a very important place for Huguenots in London. It provided one of the first places of worship for the refugees in 1550.

Rocque’s Map showing Threadneedle Street and the French Church, 1746
Rocque’s Map showing Threadneedle Street and the French Church, 1746

The Church of St. Anthony's Hospital in Threadneedle Street was given to the French Huguenots in 1550. It became known as the French Church.

Threadneedle Street is also home to the Bank of England. Sir John Houblon, a French Huguenot was its first governor from 1694 to 1697.

Rocque's map of London, 1746, showing the location of Nicholas Hawksmoor’s masterpiece, Christ Church Spitalfields

Rocque's map of London, 1746, showing the location of Nicholas Hawksmoor’s masterpiece, Christ Church Spitalfields

Christ Church Spitalfields was built by the Anglican church. They wanted to stop people worshipping in a non-conformist way. Building this kind of church made it clear how strong the established church was.

Map showing location of the Savoy, on the Strand, 1755
Map showing location of the Savoy, on the Strand, 1755

The Savoy Church was another important place of worship for Huguenot refugees. In 1661 Huguenots held services in the Savoy Hospital chapel.
The Netherlands, 1772.

The Netherlands, 1772.

In 1684 James II came to the throne in Britain. He was a Roman Catholic. He wanted to change Britain from a Protestant country to a Catholic country. This was not popular.

William of Orange was James II’s son-in-law. He was a Protestant, living in the Netherlands. He decided to stop James II. On 5 November 1688 he invaded Britain with an army largely made up of Huguenots.

The British Army and Navy joined William, and James fled to France. James was finally beaten at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland in 1690.

Map of the Hundred of Blackheath, showing Greenwich, Blackheath and Woolwich, 1778.
Map of the Hundred of Blackheath, showing Greenwich, Blackheath and Woolwich, 1778.

As Huguenots became more prosperous some made their homes in Greenwich.
Map of Europe 1781, showing Ireland, Mainland Britain, France, Spain and the Netherlands.
Map of Europe 1781, showing Ireland, Mainland Britain, France, Spain and the Netherlands.

This map gives some idea of the long and frightening journeys people would have made as they travelled across Europe seeking safety.

Although this map dates from 1781 it relates to the whole history of the Huguenot refugees.

Cary's New and Accurate Plan of London and Westminster, 1787
Cary's New and Accurate Plan of London and Westminster, 1787

Cary’s map shows Spitalfields. Spitalfields was one of the areas with a large Huguenot weaving community.
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